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itswalky:

dorkly:

EA Responds To Being Named ‘The Worst Company in America’
In a recent poll on Consumerist.com, it was decided that Electronic Arts was the worst company in America. This is the second year in a row that EA has taken the top prize. In response, EA’s COO Peter Moore has released this statement.

ha ha ha ha heh heh sob

itswalky:

dorkly:

EA Responds To Being Named ‘The Worst Company in America’

In a recent poll on Consumerist.com, it was decided that Electronic Arts was the worst company in America. This is the second year in a row that EA has taken the top prize. In response, EA’s COO Peter Moore has released this statement.

ha ha ha ha heh heh sob

(via mxmlmn)

05:34 pm: joshuhn28,717 notes

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fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

The woman who tore Britain apart

Margaret Thatcher, the most hated British prime minister of the 20th century, died today.


Victims of her vicious 1980s onslaught against the working class refused to show any sorrow over the final demise of the frail 87-year-old after a stroke.
Spontaneous exultation broke out across Britain as news of her death spread like wildfire.
The strongest waves of satisfaction were in former mining and industrial communities ravaged by Thatcher, and among labour movement activists throughout the land.
Following vocal protests, No 10 shelved plans for a state funeral, announcing that she will receive a ceremonial funeral at St Paul’s Cathedral.
Thatcher blighted Britain during her ruthless rule from 1979 to 1990.
She once regarded herself as the indestructible goddess of rapacious capitalism, often deploying the royal “We” during her arrogant diatribes.
Overseas she was a friend to tyranny who attacked Nelson Mandela and the ANC as terrorists but praised mass-murdering Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet for “bringing democracy to Chile.”

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

The woman who tore Britain apart

Margaret Thatcher, the most hated British prime minister of the 20th century, died today.

Victims of her vicious 1980s onslaught against the working class refused to show any sorrow over the final demise of the frail 87-year-old after a stroke.

Spontaneous exultation broke out across Britain as news of her death spread like wildfire.

The strongest waves of satisfaction were in former mining and industrial communities ravaged by Thatcher, and among labour movement activists throughout the land.

Following vocal protests, No 10 shelved plans for a state funeral, announcing that she will receive a ceremonial funeral at St Paul’s Cathedral.

Thatcher blighted Britain during her ruthless rule from 1979 to 1990.

She once regarded herself as the indestructible goddess of rapacious capitalism, often deploying the royal “We” during her arrogant diatribes.

Overseas she was a friend to tyranny who attacked Nelson Mandela and the ANC as terrorists but praised mass-murdering Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet for “bringing democracy to Chile.”

06:27 pm: joshuhn75 notes

quote

2013 is a year where “big” science fiction properties are getting a lot of attention: There’s a new Star Trek movie. A much discussed and anticipated Star Wars movie is under development. And, most importantly, Doctor Who celebrates its 50th birthday. Yes, that’s right; I wrote “most importantly” because, when it comes down to it, Doctor Who is the best pop culture sci-fi around.

Sure, in terms of financial earnings or even just cultural awareness, Wars and Trek have the British time-travel series beat. Despite the show’s impressive growth with American audiences since its 2005 relaunch, most here would choose to fly in either the Millennium Falcon or the Enterprise over the TARDIS any day. But in terms of core concept, Doctor Who is filled with possibility in a way that few other science fictions can truly compare with.

08:27 am: joshuhn2,264 notes

video

edwardspoonhands:

“Failure’s still something I can say I’ve achieved.” I just watched this four times.

08:26 am: joshuhn1,500 notes

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aseaofquotes:

Charles Bukowski, “Weather Report”

aseaofquotes:

Charles Bukowski, “Weather Report”

06:58 am: joshuhn2,364 notes

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effyeahnerdfighters:

From Looking for Alaska
(submitted by breadfairy)

effyeahnerdfighters:

From Looking for Alaska

(submitted by breadfairy)

(via corabubbles)

11:08 am: joshuhn134,845 notes

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aseaofquotes:

Lawrence Durrell, Justine

aseaofquotes:

Lawrence Durrell, Justine

07:07 am: joshuhn1,810 notes

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justagirldemi:

magicalzonbi:

pinkrobotgirl:

fleecedragons:

myheartofgoldturnedplatinum:

alwaysyourbaby:

desert-revolution:


I firmly believe that the reason many Slytherins were easily convinced to join Voldemort was because they were treated like shit by the rest of the houses while they were growing up. Imagine spending seven of the most important years of your life being told that you were part of the bad house and therefore bad yourself. Everyone boos your quidditch team. All the houses will hang out with everyone except you. You grow up being hated by your fellow students and many of your teachers.
Now imagine someone comes along and tells you that you’re not worthless and bad. That you’re invited to join a family where you will right the wrongs committed against you. You have the opportunity to be wanted and powerful instead of a hated outcast. Several of your former classmates are telling you how great it is. How you’re welcomed and needed. These are the kids you grew up with. The classmates who went through all the same things you did. Being a Death Eater sounds pretty good now.

I’ve been waiting for a post like this.

THIS.

BLESS THIS POST

!!!!
thank

I was always bothered by the scene at the end of book 7, when the students are asked whether they want to fight the incoming Death Eater army. The Slytherin students are all like, “Uh. No?” And they’re treated like terrorists for it. In the movie, they’re even locked in the school dungeons while everyone cheers.
Did nobody stop to think and realize that if the Sytherin students had stood and fought, they would have been facing their own parents on a battlefield? Even if some of them weren’t really on board with the whole Death Eater thing, expecting them to fight was just cruel. They were children. The oldest of them were seventeen. Babies. And their own professors were asking them to shoot illegal killing spells at Mum and Dad.
Imagine you are a Slytherin and you are staying behind to defend your school and maybe restore some honor to your House. The other students are all giving you mistrustful glares. You know they’re waiting for you to start hitting them in the back with stunning spells. You consider doing it, too, because you’re already starting to regret the choice you made.
Then the battle begins, and you are up against a crowd of strangers who aren’t strangers at all. You recognize voices, muffled behind masks but still piercingly familiar. Your uncle. Your cousin. Your best friend’s big sister.
And then you see a tall man in expensive grey robes. A moment later you notice the small, curvy woman next to him, wand ready. They are guarding each others backs.
You recognize their shoes.

This is the third time I’ve reblogged this, but I’ll do it every time.
“It was you who added ‘evil’ to my name.”

THEY DID FIGHT EVENTUALLY THOUGH!!  And everyone forgets this. Slughorn comes out with a band of students towards the middle of the battle. JK Rowling said in an interview that those were the Slytherins. I swear we fight and that we’re not all evil. 

justagirldemi:

magicalzonbi:

pinkrobotgirl:

fleecedragons:

myheartofgoldturnedplatinum:

alwaysyourbaby:

desert-revolution:

I firmly believe that the reason many Slytherins were easily convinced to join Voldemort was because they were treated like shit by the rest of the houses while they were growing up. Imagine spending seven of the most important years of your life being told that you were part of the bad house and therefore bad yourself. Everyone boos your quidditch team. All the houses will hang out with everyone except you. You grow up being hated by your fellow students and many of your teachers.

Now imagine someone comes along and tells you that you’re not worthless and bad. That you’re invited to join a family where you will right the wrongs committed against you. You have the opportunity to be wanted and powerful instead of a hated outcast. Several of your former classmates are telling you how great it is. How you’re welcomed and needed. These are the kids you grew up with. The classmates who went through all the same things you did. Being a Death Eater sounds pretty good now.

I’ve been waiting for a post like this.

THIS.

BLESS THIS POST

!!!!

thank

I was always bothered by the scene at the end of book 7, when the students are asked whether they want to fight the incoming Death Eater army. The Slytherin students are all like, “Uh. No?” And they’re treated like terrorists for it. In the movie, they’re even locked in the school dungeons while everyone cheers.

Did nobody stop to think and realize that if the Sytherin students had stood and fought, they would have been facing their own parents on a battlefield? Even if some of them weren’t really on board with the whole Death Eater thing, expecting them to fight was just cruel. They were children. The oldest of them were seventeen. Babies. And their own professors were asking them to shoot illegal killing spells at Mum and Dad.

Imagine you are a Slytherin and you are staying behind to defend your school and maybe restore some honor to your House. The other students are all giving you mistrustful glares. You know they’re waiting for you to start hitting them in the back with stunning spells. You consider doing it, too, because you’re already starting to regret the choice you made.

Then the battle begins, and you are up against a crowd of strangers who aren’t strangers at all. You recognize voices, muffled behind masks but still piercingly familiar. Your uncle. Your cousin. Your best friend’s big sister.

And then you see a tall man in expensive grey robes. A moment later you notice the small, curvy woman next to him, wand ready. They are guarding each others backs.

You recognize their shoes.

This is the third time I’ve reblogged this, but I’ll do it every time.

“It was you who added ‘evil’ to my name.”

THEY DID FIGHT EVENTUALLY THOUGH!!  And everyone forgets this. Slughorn comes out with a band of students towards the middle of the battle. JK Rowling said in an interview that those were the Slytherins. I swear we fight and that we’re not all evil. 

(Source: zaynx, via the-city-mouse)

11:49 am: joshuhn159,324 notes

video

jtotheizzoe:

“Lightning Made from Molasses”

When lightning travels through air, its fractal extensions and plasma-infused tendrils are only present for a fleeting fraction of a second. This makes studying those patterns a bit difficult, obviously.

You could use an expensive high-speed camera to capture the phenomenon at >7,000 frames per second, but there’s a much cheaper method: Pump 15,000 volts through plywood.

That’s what Melanie Hoff did above. Sure, it’s not a perfect recreation of a meteorological event, but the slow creep of fractal zaps makes their patterns, and how they are created, jump out. A lesson in math, or weather? You decide.

(via Open Culture)

07:41 pm: joshuhn162 notes

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aseaofquotes:

Tom Rachman, The Imperfectionists
Submitted by infinitesimaler.

aseaofquotes:

Tom Rachman, The Imperfectionists

Submitted by infinitesimaler.

06:23 pm: joshuhn645 notes